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30 Days of Health

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  1. Day 1 - PURPOSE-DRIVEN
    7 Inspirations
  2. Day 2 - REALISTIC
    7 Inspirations
  3. Day 3 - HABITUAL
    7 Inspirations
  4. Day 4 - SOCIAL
    6 Inspirations
  5. Day 5 - ORGANIZED
    6 Inspirations
  6. Day 6 - DESIGNED
    6 Inspirations
  7. Day 7 - CONNECTED
    6 Inspirations
  8. Day 8 - MOVEMENT
    6 Inspirations
  9. Day 9 - RESTED
    6 Inspirations
  10. Day 10 - NUTRITIOUS
    6 Inspirations
  11. Day 11 - HYDRATED
    6 Inspirations
  12. Day 12 - CONTENT
    6 Inspirations
  13. Day 13 - COMMUNAL
    6 Inspirations
  14. Day 14 - KIND
    6 Inspirations
  15. Day 15 - FAITHFUL
    6 Inspirations
  16. Day 16 - TRADITIONAL
    6 Inspirations
  17. Day 17 - GROUNDED
    6 Inspirations
  18. Day 18 - ENVIRONMENTAL
    6 Inspirations
  19. Day 19 - PURE
    6 Inspirations
  20. Day 20 - HAPPY
    6 Inspirations
  21. Day 21 - SELFLESS
    6 Inspirations
  22. Day 22 - DILIGENT
    6 Inspirations
  23. Day 23 - REFLECTIVE
    6 Inspirations
  24. Day 24 - BALANCED
    6 Inspirations
  25. Day 25 - HONEST
    6 Inspirations
  26. Day 26 - PLAYFUL
    7 Inspirations
  27. Day 27 - DETERMINED
    6 Inspirations
  28. Day 28 - DISCIPLINED
    7 Inspirations
  29. Day 29 - INTENTIONAL
    6 Inspirations
  30. Day 30 - HEALTHY
    6 Inspirations
Session 21, Inspiration 2
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SELFLESS – STUDIES SHOWS

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When helping others is healthy, and when it’s not.

Providing help to others seems to increase our well-being only when we provide it of our own free will. If we feel compelled to help, whether by another person or by internally self-generated pressures such as shame or pride, helping others won't actually increase our well-being. Our sense of well-being may indeed increase in proportion to the help we provide, but only if our desire to provide it is autonomous. Any action we take to help others, in other words, must feel as if it was our idea.

Helping others can provide us with enthusiasm, encouragement, and even joy by forcing us to summon them when we’re feeling discouraged. Thus, the moments in which we feel happiest aren't just moments to be enjoyed. They're also opportunities to increase the frequency and intensity with which we feel them in the future.

A collection of statistics representing the largest and longest-standing series of observations on happiness in the world, the trait most strongly associated with long-term increases in life satisfaction is, in fact, a persistent commitment to pursuing altruistic goals. That is, the more we focus on compassionate action, on helping others, the happier we seem to become in the long run.

REFERENCES

Weinstein N, Ryan RM. When helping helps: autonomous motivation for prosocial behavior and its influence on well-being for the helper and recipient. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2010 Feb;98(2):222-44. doi: 10.1037/a0016984.

Headey, B. The Set Point Theory of Well-Being Has Serious Flaws: On the Eve of a Scientific Revolution? Soc Indic Res (2010) 97: 7. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11205-009-9559-x

Session 21, Inspiration 2
In Progress