Back to Journey

30 Days of Health

0% Complete
0/0 Steps
  1. Day 1 - PURPOSE-DRIVEN
    7 Inspirations
  2. Day 2 - REALISTIC
    7 Inspirations
  3. Day 3 - HABITUAL
    7 Inspirations
  4. Day 4 - SOCIAL
    6 Inspirations
  5. Day 5 - ORGANIZED
    6 Inspirations
  6. Day 6 - DESIGNED
    6 Inspirations
  7. Day 7 - CONNECTED
    6 Inspirations
  8. Day 8 - MOVEMENT
    6 Inspirations
  9. Day 9 - RESTED
    6 Inspirations
  10. Day 10 - NUTRITIOUS
    6 Inspirations
  11. Day 11 - HYDRATED
    6 Inspirations
  12. Day 12 - CONTENT
    6 Inspirations
  13. Day 13 - COMMUNAL
    6 Inspirations
  14. Day 14 - KIND
    6 Inspirations
  15. Day 15 - FAITHFUL
    6 Inspirations
  16. Day 16 - TRADITIONAL
    6 Inspirations
  17. Day 17 - GROUNDED
    6 Inspirations
  18. Day 18 - ENVIRONMENTAL
    6 Inspirations
  19. Day 19 - PURE
    6 Inspirations
  20. Day 20 - HAPPY
    6 Inspirations
  21. Day 21 - SELFLESS
    6 Inspirations
  22. Day 22 - DILIGENT
    6 Inspirations
  23. Day 23 - REFLECTIVE
    6 Inspirations
  24. Day 24 - BALANCED
    6 Inspirations
  25. Day 25 - HONEST
    6 Inspirations
  26. Day 26 - PLAYFUL
    7 Inspirations
  27. Day 27 - DETERMINED
    6 Inspirations
  28. Day 28 - DISCIPLINED
    7 Inspirations
  29. Day 29 - INTENTIONAL
    6 Inspirations
  30. Day 30 - HEALTHY
    6 Inspirations
Session 4, Inspiration 2
In Progress

SOCIAL – STUDIES SHOWS

Session Progress
0% Complete

A 2014 study published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that friends bond more when providing one another with moral support to resist a temptation. However, friends also commonly conspire together to enjoy indulgences. Researchers discovered that when it came to resisting temptations—like eating chocolate—sometimes friends were more likely to become partners in crime as they decided to indulge together.

Researchers Michael L. Lowe (Texas A&M University) and Kelly L. Haws (Vanderbilt University) stated, “Our findings provide insights into how consumers can most effectively use others for accountability in trying to achieve important goals, while potentially enhancing their well-being through managing guilt and being able to enjoy smaller indulgences in the company of friends.”

In summary, we act more like the people we surround ourselves with so we should be intentional to surround ourselves with people who inspire and challenge us to become better.

REFERENCES

(Im)moral Support: The Social Outcomes of Parallel Self-Control Decisions.” Journal of Consumer Research: August 2014 by Michael L. Lowe (Texas A&M University) and Kelly L. Haws (Vanderbilt University)

Session 4, Inspiration 2
In Progress